Thursday, July 10, 2008

Lon(Don T)ransport

Gants Hill Tube StationAlmost a year ago one of our members asked that we raise the issue of flooding at Gants Hill Tube Station. In September two posts followed reporting on the stalemate between Transport for London and Redbridge Council over who does not have responsibility for the lack of adequate drainage which causes flooding of the ticket office in times of heavy rain.

Gants Hill Tube Flood
Ken on Gants Hill Tube Flood
Subway Ping-Pong

So, while I was being driven down to Kent on Monday during heavy rain, I did wonder. And when I get back, what’s waiting in my inbox? This!

Talk about wet - Gants Hill station flooded again, so I diverted to Newbury Park, then went by bus. Got to the subway by Jessups, only to find it ankle deep in water, so I had to walk down to Beehive Lane then cross the Eastern Avenue to get home that way. What a pain. I wish I knew who is responsible for the subway, I know they have been moaned at in the past about flooding, but still nothing has been done. - Colin

I know it’s only 2 months since Boris got elected but, Progress Report please, Roger.

4 comments:

  1. Miss Tajinder Lachhar1:30 pm, July 11, 2008

    On Monday, I saw the heavy rain and wondered whether Gants Hill station would flood as I have much experience of this. Then my partner called saying Gants Hill had flooded and could I pick him up from Redbridge as it was still pouring with rain and Gants Hill was closed.

    On Tuesday I attended an Environment Partnership meeting and there was a chap talking about the Gants Hill regeneration. Silly me, I forgot to ask whether the flooding of the tube station would be incorporated into this plan.

    I assume the 'clever people' have incorporated this into the regeneration plans. Can someone please put me out of my misery and tell me that this has been taken care of as part of the regeneration plans?

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  2. I think the cheapest solution to the flooding would be to put canopies over the entrance stairs and ramps to prevent the rain getting into the subway. It seems that the current system can cope with steady rain, but a quick downpour overloads the system.

    Colin
    Gants Hill

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  3. Good idea, a step up, before you take the stairs down, or for wheelchairs a slight ramp up before the slope down would stop excess rainfall cascading into the subway and ticket office.

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