Sunday, September 07, 2014

The Name Game

Last Friday (5th September) at 6pm a group of Redbridge notables (including our Chair) gathered in the Vision Suite at the Town Hall to consider the suggestions for a name for the remodeled “Barkingside Town Square” and decide on a short list of three for the public to vote on.

So, we have sight of the full list of suggestions, and we know the final short list, but we are not allowed to tell you yet as this will be published on Redbridge-i tomorrow (Monday), probably on this page when you will be able to vote for one of the three options. There will also be an opportunity to vote at Fullwell Cross library using an archaic medium based on materials known as "paper" and "ink".

What we can say is that the final three options are a manifestation of the old adage that the answer lies in the question, which was “Please name the Barkingside Town Square”. Frankly we are not amused at the lack of imagination or creativity in the selection process which appears to have been geared towards the usual dull and passionless characteristics for which local government is known in these here parts.

However, all is not lost. Have you noticed how places (and things) sometimes get known through local folk law and the name sticks. We have pancake hill in Claybury Park and the Egg Whisk (which hasn't even appeared yet) at Gants Hill plus many others.

So, here we start the campaign to call the revamped patio area:……

The Arches


This was the consensus in The George Wanstead after the meeting.

3 comments:

  1. could be "archie" square or "I'm eating me kfc init "square

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  2. Dum-di-dum-di-dum-di-dum, an everyday story of country folk. No, that's "The Archers".

    "Honey, ah sugar, sugar - you are my candy girl?". No, that one's "The Archies".

    Here we go. Flanders and Swann: "Underneath the arches...". A favourite haunt of the down and outs and the alcoholics, if I'm not mistaken.

    Be careful what you wish for....

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  3. Being as the monks from Barking came once a year to lop the original Oak, hence the name Fairlop, and as the new design looks like the cloisters, I reckon it should be called the "Fairlop Cloisters" - If I may say so, this construction is as daft as even my suggestion for a name.

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