Tuesday, April 09, 2013

20MPH = Living Streets

Over to you Redbridge Council ...

click on image to enlarge

9 comments:

  1. Not a good idea in Redbridge, going at 20mph you will probably get a parking ticket, or get clocked by the Spy Car for a £60 fine for "stopping" on a yellow line

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  2. think passing a driving test might be a first......(-)judging by some of the driving that i see.but i think its a good idea as the amount of parked cars that have appeared in the residential streets of Hainault and chigwell lately it seems safer.

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    1. There is a responsibility in law to adjust one's driving speed to one that traffic conditions allow, subject to whatever maximum may apply.

      In my own locality this means that I frequently proceed along the road at somewhat less than 30 mph only to be "tailgated" in a menacing fashion by another driver. When they are unimpeded many of those drive at 40 mph despite the maximum of 30 mph.

      Road humps and speed cushions are not the answer - a police officer with a speed gun and a book of £60 penalty tickets is (together with the 3 points on the licence).

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  3. I very much doubt that 71% figure ... Perhaps they printed the figures in the wrong order ...?

    If you consider the matter logically, if 71% of drivers observed a top speed of 20mph on residential streets - where there is rarely room for overtaking - the vast majority of the remaining 29% would have no choice but to follow suit most of the time. So therefore, virtually everybody is driving at 20mph or less already - so what's the fuss about?

    There is a considerable difference between driving safely and considerately, which I'm entirely in favour of, and being forced to permanently keep to an unnaturally low speed by some draconian law. If Morris gets his way and the radar guns come out, the accident rate will go through the roof because the one thing that will occupy 99% of many drivers' attention will be the speedometer needle ...

    Just who is this limit supposed to protect, I wonder? The jaywalker, presumably, and the breed of cyclist who think it is their right to be able ride anywhere in any direction at as high a speed as they can without any consideration for other road (and footpath) users ...

    It seems to me that the aim here is to punish the innocent because nobody can be bothered to take the guilty to task ...



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    1. If you consider the matter logically, if 71% of drivers observed a top speed of 20mph on residential streets - where there is rarely room for overtaking - the vast majority of the remaining 29% would have no choice but to follow suit most of the time.

      WRONG! This is based on the assumption that traffic in residential roads is a continuous bumper to bumper stream. It is not. That's why cars can speed in residential roads but not Barkingside High Street, except maybe in the small hours when it's like er ... a residential road.

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    2. Knowsie, when you are driving on the motorway are you looking at the road ahead or the speedometer needle to make sure you don't stray over 70mph?

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    3. A competent and experienced driver is able to judge his/her speed with only a small margin of error. Constantly watching the speedometer needle suggests a level of "competence" rendering the driver unsuitable to have a licence.

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    4. That's why cars can speed in residential roads ...

      And you think that a big sign with 20 on it will deter the boy racers? The signs with 30 on them don't seem to work so what is so magic about the others?

      A competent and experienced driver is able to judge his/her speed with only a small margin of error.

      And lots of drivers make emergency brake applications every time they encounter a Gatso camera although they are driving at or (well) below the speed limit ...

      Motorway driving is entirely different to driving in town. Even so, assuming a clear road, changes in road surface, gradients, etc. will have an effect on speed. Ask anybody who has driven a car with cruise control about their first reactions and invariably it will be the surprise at the sudden burst of power at the foot of a rising gradient.

      Another factor frequently overlooked is that the average speedometer reads ~5mph slow at 70mph so the speed of driver who sticks to a notional 70 can vary without any danger of exceeding the actual limit.

      However, it is generally physically impossible to drive at a constant speed on residential roads. Long straights with no hazards are comparatively rare and speeds are continually changing.

      It would be interesting to conduct a series of tests with blanked off speedometers and monitor the speed of drivers asked to drive at a constant 70 and then a constant 20 ...

      If Morris gets his wish to have a copper hiding behind every lamp post the 'Gatso effect' will kick in with lots of drivers terrified that they will get a ticket if the get caught driving at 1mph above the limit ...

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    5. Not sure where you are going with this Knowsie?

      It seems to me that the aim here is to punish the innocent because nobody can be bothered to take the guilty to task ...

      To take the guilty to task you first need to catch them, and to do that you need Morris' coppers with speed guns, the speed limit is irrelevant to this line of argument.

      The fact is that 20mph in residential roads is MUCH safer for pedestrians and is statistically proven. The argument that some people break to law (speed limit) is not an argument for not having the law!

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