Monday, December 14, 2009

No Room at the Inn


Time is running out for tigers

"There could be as few as 3,200 wild tigers left in the world."





Another bird of prey killed

"There was a rabbit next to it, also dead with its body cut open. I knew then the red kite had been poisoned."






Dead foxes are being found on a local allotment site. There is evidence to suggest they have been poisoned.




Addition: I knew there was another one I'd seen recently. Australian Camels are being killed for being thirsty.






And on the seventh day God realised that sometimes doing nothing is better than doing something, badly.

18 comments:

  1. Urban foxes are vermin. They have no natural predator to keep their numbers down, and they foul everywhere - I have to check my garden each time for fox droppings before letting the kids out there. They rip open rubbish bags and spread the litter.

    If someone is poisoning them, it is not doubt because certain councillors are so bound up in their own fuzzy-wuzzy view of ickle-wickle furry things that they will not allow proper control of foxes.

    In a rural environment, foxes form part of natural species control - but Barkingside is an urban environment.

    And I see no mention in the WWF piece about tiger predation for use in Chinese medicines.

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  2. Did you know (according to "QI" on BBC2) that there are more Tigers in private ownership (mostly in the USA) than in the wild.

    An opportunity, perhaps, for a captive-breeding programme and a 're-stocking' of wild habitats.

    Also on TV, however, is the news that wild habitats are being overtaken by Humans and Tigers are coming into populated areas (that used to be their areas) to seek food and are therefore attacking Humans (ditto, Polar Bears but ...).

    Polar Bears are being darted and flown to unpopulated areas. Tigers are simply being shot in "self-defence".

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  3. I do know about the foxes found on the allotment but may I stress that we do not think that any one of us would do such a thing as poisoning them. One 'good' reason: it's illegal and doing 'illegal' things on an allotment would be an immediate instant exclusion. (And we mean it!)
    I agree with Mark, I am a hippy and I want to boast about the hundreds of snails sheltering in the red cabbages. The hearts of the cabbages are unaffected, the leaves can remain on site where lots of little snails can grow bigger.
    One can live in harmony with nature.
    Another 'hippy' friend has frogs hopping amongst her plants.
    annesevant

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  4. Judith,

    They have no natural predator to keep their numbers down, and they foul everywhere

    Just who or what are we talking about here?

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  5. Er - foxes?

    Pet owners are (rightly) encouraged to neuter cats and dogs to prevent a surfeit of feral animals (and needless suffering of the animals themselves), yet because of misplaced sentimentality, we allow this infestation of foxes in our urban environment to thrive.

    I do not support individuals poisoning animals however, and believe there should be a proper and legal culling process.

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  6. Judith is more knowlegeable than me (much more!) so I will tread carefully!
    I don't think Councils could control foxes event if they wanted to. It would seem that the only acceptable method for control is shooting the foxes. This is not going to happen in an urban area.
    Droppings in the garden: an unpleasant problem difficult to avoid but the rubbish bags ripped opened, that is not inevitable. No food leftovers outside until the last minute is helpful. Spraying the bags with a household cleaning chemical is a deterrent to the foxes' partners in crime: the magpies. They hate the smell of polish. (So do I!)
    annesevant

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  7. The most effective way of controlling the population of the Urban Fox is to control its food supply.

    To do this we need to control those who "have no natural predator to keep their numbers down, and foul everywhere", ie those who discard their takeaways willy nilly.

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  8. What do we do about those misguided souls who actually make a point of feeding the damn things though?

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  9. I suspect their contribution is insignificant compared to the other group?

    And it means the Fox is in their garden and not yours!

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  10. Sorry, your logic is faulty - strengthening one portion of the fox population by regular feeding encourages further breeding, so more foxes foraging (and pooing) in my garden!

    (You'll gather I feel strongly about this)

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  11. Judith or Barkingside 21?
    Judith!
    There are lots of kind souls who feed the foxes!
    But don't tell them they are misguided!
    They are lots of responsible Redbridge residents who take the car to take the dog so the dog can pooh in the grass in Claybury Park!
    I am shocked to observe this behaviour on so many occasions. Is it ignorance? I am not telling them but I feel that a few posters in addition to the dog bins could help a lot.
    annesevant

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  12. I sort of gathered that, Judith from your comment in 2007.

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  13. I did click on the link and, plus ca va plus c'est la meme chose!
    Where is Monsieur Hickey who had left a rather risque comment?
    annesevant

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  14. Where are the Ilford and West Essex Foxhounds wehen they're needed? That's what I want to know. And the Countryside Alliance are no help whatsoever.

    Roger Backhouse

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  15. Tigers, Orangutans Bears, Gorillas, and other animals that are having their habitats continually shrunk/taken from them by humans seeking more homes or needing land for cultivation or to supply timber etc, seem to have the right idea. As Jawal1 said Tigers and Bears pillage homes erected on their old hunting territory. Elephants on historic routes to water holes, taught to them by their ancestors will actually walk through newly built dwellings without a second thought. I don't blame them one bit, they need to survive. Who are we to deny them that right. most of us are so quick to defend these kind of animals, yet we are doing the same kind of thing here, spreading our habitats into the countryside
    Due to human interference the rabbit population (main diet of the fox) has been sadly decreased. Foxes found an easy food chain in our plastic bags, and until we all take the necessary precautions with our waste food the fox will be around.
    What I cant stand is poisoning them its a dreadful painful death.
    'Forest Foxes' a fox rescue group,
    mentions just last week 4 foxes who were living underground on a construction site in East London was deliberately buried alive. Call
    ourselves humans. Come on if you don't wont them, make sure you don't leave anything out for them to eat and if it worries that much ask your neighbours to do the same. I make sure there's nothing in my garden and they don't come around. Please don't poison them
    that's a terrible way to get rid of them, it's illegal too.
    Ron King

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  16. Jawal1 referred to it and Ron King mentioned it; the growth in human population numbers. If we want other species to survive and prosper we have to control our own.
    So how are we going to proceed with that objecive in mind I wonder?

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  17. David,
    We don't have to. Mother Nature is going to do it for us. Sooner rather than later, now that the Muppets have Copped out in Copenhagen.

    When the biosphere gets too far out of balance it collapses into mass extinction and then recovers. We've already had five of these.

    "The only thing that we have learned from History, is that nobody learns from History".

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  18. Might it be that nobody learns from history because they are likely to be dead by the time the errors of their ways takes its toll?

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